FAQ

 

WHAT IS MICROBLADING?

Microblading is semi-permanent tattoo of the eyebrow whereby a series of strategically-placed superficial incisions are made using a sterile blade and pigment, creating fuller symmetrical brows.


DOES IT HURT?

Numbing cream is applied which will either make the procedure painless or slightly scratchy.


WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT?

Intricate measurements based on your facial features will be acquired, and your correct or preferred brow shape will be outlined. You will be shown the final outline before microblading is commenced. As the superficial incisions heal, the brows become much darker for the next few days. (For this reason it’s best not to have microblading within a week prior to an event where you may have lots of photos taken!). The pigment then starts to shed, the brows may look patchy, then the colour usually reappears! This is normal and everyone's brows change based on their skin type and aftercare routine. This is the importance of the touch up appointment, to go over any areas which have not held the pigment. This is a normal process for everyone, but because everyone has different skin, the healing process also varies.

Please read ‘Pre-microblading Info’ prior to your appointment.


HOW LONG DOES IT LAST?

12-18 months in general. Up to two years if your skin is dry, and closer to 12 months if it’s oily. Other factors such as environmental (sun, swimming, saunas) and moisturizers can effect the longevity. Skin Tone and hair colour are taken into account for best possible healed results.


DO RESULTS VARY WITH SKIN TYPE?

Yes. Dry skin holds pigment longer (up to two years) while oily skin holds pigment up to one year. Skin tone and hair colour are taken into consideration to allow the best possible healed results. Environmental factors (sun, swimming, sweating, saunas) and skin products will also affect the healing and end result differently on different skin.


WHO CAN'T BE MICROBLADED?

Persons under 18 years of age, if you're pregnant (breastfeeding is okay), with caution in uncontrolled diabetes or hypertension and those on blood thinners (unless they have approval from their GP), allergy to pigment or anaesthetics, and those on chemotherapy or are immunocompromised as it increases the chance of infection (unless approval is sought from their doctor/specialist).


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